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Sacramento Estate Planning Attorney

December 2011 Archives

Man intentionally wills property, money to government

Most people go through the estate planning process to ensure that when they die, as much of their estate as possible escapes the clutches of Uncle Sam. However, in a case that California readers may find interesting, one Florida man chose to do the exact opposite. That is, he intentionally left his historic house, along with $1 million, to the federal government through his will.The man, who died in December 2010 at the age of 87, had lived in his Coral Gables home for almost his entire life. The home was reportedly worth more than $1 million, and it sold for $1.175 million in a recent auction. A news report states the contents of the home will also be auctioned off by the government in January.

Estate taxes may rise in 2013

One of the concerns that California residents have when they do estate planning is the effects of federal taxes on their estate. At the moment, estate taxes have an exemption amount of $5 million with a top marginal rate of 35 percent, but that exemption is set to expire in 2013. If no action is taken by Congress, then the exemption will fall to $1 million and the top marginal rate will rise to 55 percent. So readers of this blog may be particularly interested in a piece of legislation by Rep. Jim McDermott, D-Washington.The bill, called the Sensible Estate Tax Act of 2011, was recently introduced a week before Thanksgiving. If passed, the bill would allow the top marginal tax rate to rise to 55 percent, as it would under current law. However, the bill also proposes that the current exemption amount be allowed to expire, and that the $1 million exemption be indexed for inflation starting in 2000. That would mean the exemption amount would fall from the current $5 million for individuals and $10 million for couples to $1.31 million for individuals and $2.61 million for couples.

Heiress estate plan leaves $33M to private nurse

When a person has a substantial estate to transfer upon their death, he or she will often utilize wills and trusts to handle many of the issues that they may face. Wills and trusts are often an excellent way to avoid probate court and to see that the deceased person's wishes are followed when it comes to asset protection. One Filipino woman who owns property in California and elsewhere understands the importance of estate planning as she is expected to inherit some $33 million from a wealthy recluse she had nursed for years.The massive inheritance that Hadassah Peri is expected to receive comes from Huguette Clark. Ms. Clark died at the age of 104 and is the daughter of a wealthy copper baron. She is perhaps best known for her reclusive behavior, having not been seen in public circles for an estimated 70 years. Mrs. Peri has been Clark's private nurse (and reportedly close personal friend) for over 20 years. She came to the United States in 1972 from the Philippines.

In Jobs we trust: What we can learn from Steve Jobs' estate

Many people seem to believe that the term "estate planning" doesn't apply to them. To those people, only the rich and famous need to worry about intricacies of estate planning, because only they have estates worth making a plan for. That's simply not true. Average Americans from California to New York can profit by thinking ahead toward avoiding probate. One way to do that is to establish a trust.

Power of attorney: Important for your healthcare

Estate planning is critical, even though we often make excuses for avoiding it. Making decisions about how worldly possessions will be distributed upon one's death is part of the process, but it's not the only part that should be involved in estate planning for California residents. It is also critical to make decisions regarding personal care should one become incapacitated due to illness or injury.

My Sacramento law practice, Michael A. Sawamura, Attorney at Law, focuses on wills, trusts and estate planning law in addition to business law and corporate defense services. My clients include professionals, government employees, small businesses, blue-collar workers and national corporations.

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